Home Equity Loan Interest Still Deductible (Sometimes)

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, enacted December 22, 2017, suspends from 2018 until 2026 the deduction for interest paid on home equity loans and lines of credit, unless they are used to buy, build or substantially improve the taxpayer’s home that secures the loan. Under the new law, for example, interest on a home equity loan used to build an addition to an existing home is typically deductible, while interest on the same loan used to pay personal … Read More

Is Canceled Debt Taxable?

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

Generally, debt that is forgiven or canceled by a lender is considered taxable income by the IRS and must be included as income on your tax return. Examples include a debt for which you are personally liable such as mortgage debt, credit card debt, and in some instances, student loan debt. When that debt is forgiven, negotiated down (when you pay less than you owe), or canceled you will receive Form 1099-C, Cancellation of Debt, from your financial institution or … Read More

Ten Key Tax Facts about Home Sales

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

Exclusion of Gain.You may be able to exclude part or all of the gain from the sale of your home. This rule may apply if you meet the eligibility test. Parts of the test involve your ownership and use of the home. You must have owned and used it as your main home for at least two out of the five years before the date of sale.Exceptions May ApplyThere are exceptions to the ownership, use, and other rules. One exception ... Read More

Defer Capital Gains using 1031 Like-Kind Exchanges

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

If you’re a savvy investor, you probably know that you must generally report as income any mutual fund distributions whether you reinvest them or exchange shares in one fund for shares of another. In other words, you must report and pay any capital gains tax owed. But if real estate’s your game, did you know that it’s possible to defer capital gains by taking advantage of a tax break that allows you to swap investment property on a tax-deferred basis? … Read More

Turn Your Vacation into a Tax Deduction

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

Tim, who owns his own business, decided he wanted to take a two-week trip around the US. So he did–and was able to legally deduct every dime that he spent on his vacation. Here’s how he did it. 1. Make all your business appointments before you leave for your trip. Example: Tim wants to vacation in Hawaii. If he places several advertisements for distributors, or contacts some of his downline distributors to perform a presentation, then the IRS would accept … Read More

Tax Tips for Individuals Selling Their Home

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

If you sell your home and make a profit, do you know that the gain may not be taxable? That’s just one key tax rule that you should know. Here are ten facts to keep in mind if you sell your home this year. 1. If you have a capital gain on the sale of your home, you may be able to exclude your gain from tax. This rule may apply if you owned and used it as your main … Read More

Renting Out a Vacation Home

Brian SingletonBlog, Watch Your Wallet

Tax rules on rental income from second homes can be complicated, particularly if you rent the home out for several months of the year, but also use the home yourself. There is however, one provision that is not complicated. Homeowners who rent out their property for 14 or fewer days a year can pocket the rental income, tax-free. Known as the “Master’s exemption,” it is used by homeowners near the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, GA who rent out … Read More